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Table of Contents
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 25-26

Scope and need of simulation in medical education


1 Medical Education Unit Coordinator and Member of the Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission19-Nov-2020
Date of Decision01-Jan-2021
Date of Acceptance07-Jan-2021
Date of Web Publication18-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Thiruporur, Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/amjm.amjm_72_20

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  Abstract 


Quality-assured patient care is often looked upon as a combination of adequacy, accuracy, and promptness regardless of the settings. Simulation has been acknowledged as an important aspect of medical training as it immensely reduces the probability of errors done by a freshly passed student either in elective or emergency settings. The process of learning is encouraged through immersive learning, reflection by the students on their own performance, and through the feedback given by the teacher who is present. The inclusion of simulation in medical education helps the students to become competent in responding to real-life scenarios in an organized manner without jeopardizing the ethical or legal rights of the patients. In conclusion, the employment of simulation in medical education aids in the improvement of the professional performance of the medical students and ensures the safety of the patients. Thus, all the medical colleges should aim for its gradual introduction within their implemented curriculum and give a number of learning opportunities to the students.

Keywords: Medical education, simulation, skills


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Scope and need of simulation in medical education. Amrita J Med 2021;17:25-6

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Scope and need of simulation in medical education. Amrita J Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Jul 31];17:25-6. Available from: https://www.ajmonline.org.in/text.asp?2021/17/1/25/316319




  Introduction Top


Quality-assured patient care is often looked upon as a combination of adequacy, accuracy, and promptness regardless of the settings and is recognized as one of the core competencies to be acquired by the treating doctor.[1] However, the attributes of appropriate and timely management cannot be attained by anyone without practicing them in a dedicated fashion. The training which is imparted to medical students during their period of undergraduation or postgraduation becomes the foundation stone and thus lots of emphasis has to be given toward strengthening of the same at all levels of medical training.[1],[2] In fact, a number of strategies (like the use of objective-structured clinical/practical examination or workplace-based assessments or problem-based learning or simulation, etc.) have been tried upon to improve the skills of the medical students.[1]


  Expectations from the Health Sector Top


In the current era, wherein the health sector is a money-making industry, significant emphasis has been laid toward being accountable, maintain transparency, reduce iatrogenic errors, and ensure quality assurance.[2] Simulation has been acknowledged as an important aspect of medical training as it immensely reduces the probability of errors done by a freshly passed student either in elective or emergency settings.[3] We have to accept that for a student to acquire skills and become proficient or expert (Dreyfus level 4 or 5), lots of clinical exposure is required, which is quite difficult to demonstrate/practice in real patients. Moreover, we cannot delay intervention in emergency cases and it is always recommended to employ skilled professionals to manage the situation to save the life of the patient.[3]


  Simulation in Medical Education Top


Simulation in medical education depicts the artificial illustration of a complex real-world process in a simplified manner with an intention to train the medical students and improve their performance.[2] The process of learning is encouraged through immersive learning, reflection by the students on their own performance, and through the feedback given by the teacher who is present.[1] Simulation can be done either in the form of simulated/standardized patients or by models with sufficient levels of fidelity (namely combination of the technical complexity of models and the extent to which it meets the real world). The fidelity of the model needs to be decided depending on the complexity of the task to be taught and the financial assistance available.[1],[2],[3]


  Scope and Merits of Simulation Top


The inclusion of simulation in medical education helps the students to become competent in responding to real-life scenarios in an organized manner without jeopardizing the ethical or legal rights of the patients.[2],[4] Moreover, it plays an important part in improving the skills and attitude of the medical student (namely clinical skills, problem-solving skills, communication skills, etc.), reducing the incidence of accidents, and improves patient safety.[3],[4] An undergraduate student can be trained in the management of emergencies such as pericardial tamponade, tension pneumothorax or basic and advanced life skill support, or for breaking the bad news to a simulated patient. On a similar note, postgraduate students can be trained for improving communication skills or for specific procedures relevant to their specialty.[3]


  Introducing Simulation in a New Medical College Top


As simulation has a definite scope in the effective delivery of medical education, all the medical colleges should aim for its gradual implementation within their settings.[5] The simulation-based teaching can be started using simulated/standardized patients that require limited financial assistance and are used for improving the history-taking skills, communication skills, and normal physical examination.[2],[5] The institutions can gradually invest and purchase small simulations (like venepuncture arms, lumbar puncture trainers, etc.) and basic skills can be taught or practiced. Subsequently, based on the financial support available, additional equipment can be purchased and used.[3],[5] However, the faculty members should be trained in using these simulators for their optimal utilization and effective outcome.[5]

Lessons from the field

At Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a constituent unit of the Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry, a skill lab has been established as per the regulatory body norms. This skill lab has been utilized for providing basic life support and advanced cardiac life support training to all the interns and the postgraduate students. In-fact, a set of faculty members have been trained in the instructor course and they are being used as trainers for all the workshops.


  Conclusion Top


The employment of simulation in medical education aids in the improvement of the professional performance of the medical students and ensures the safety of the patients. Thus, all the medical colleges should aim for its gradual introduction within their implemented curriculum and give a number of learning opportunities to the students.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
So HY, Chen PP, Wong GK, Chan TT. Simulation in medical education. J R Coll Physicians Edinb 2019;49:52-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Datta R, Upadhyay K, Jaideep C. Simulation and its role in medical education. Med J Armed Forces India 2012;68:167-72.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Moya RP, Ruz AM, Parraguez LE, Carreño EV, Rodríguez CA, Froes MP. Simulation in medical education from the perspective of patients safety. Rev Med Chil 2017;145:514-26.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Abas T, Juma FZ. Benefits of simulation training in medical education. Adv Med Educ Pract 2016;7:399-400.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Riaz S. How simulation-based medical education can be started in low resource settings. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2019;31:636-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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Abstract
Introduction
Expectations fro...
Simulation in Me...
Scope and Merits...
Introducing Simu...
Conclusion
References

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